Fashion Exhibitions

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015

Today’s entry is a throwback post from my old blog, of the time I visited the Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015 Exhibition at London’s Victoria and Albert Museum. The reason I’ve chosen to revisit it is that, even though I’ve visited lots of exhibitions since SB, it’s still the one that I often think about, particularly after watching the McQueen documentary again just recently. I loved Alexander McQueen so much and would give anything to get the chance to revisit Savage Beauty again! So if you didn’t get around to see it, come with me on a journey back to 2015….

Before you read though, please be sympathetic to the fact that I’d only just started writing about fashion around this time-I like to think my content is a little better these days. But anyways; go 2015 me for giving it a go! Enjoy!

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015

When I visited London in May, the whole trip was originally built around seeing McQueen’s ‘Savage Beauty’ exhibition at the fabulous V&A.  I’d been to a couple of fashion exhibitions before, but nothing could ever have prepared me for what I was about to see from McQueen.  ‘Savage Beauty’ is more than just a fashion exhibition, it’s art and poetry and symbolism; an experience that offers more than just a mere collection of clothes could.  I’ve read reviews on the internet since visiting, that mock the curation of the show but frankly I disagree.  Nothing has moved me quite as much as ‘Savage Beauty’ did in a very long time.  Let me tell you more…

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015

The first thing to mention when regarding McQueen’s work is although it is in many ways dark, deep and full of meaning it is extremely well-tailored and if, like me, you are obsessed with tailoring, there is a room full of McQueen’s best work harking back to his training at Saville Row to satisfy your tailoring appetite.  McQueen knew his way around a pair of scissors, cutting from the side profile and taking the view that as the most unflattering side of a body, if an item of clothing looks good from the side then it will look good all over.  And it works.  It works because McQueen also understood the female form and how to make it look amazing.  Regarding his Bumster trousers, McQueen believed that one of the most erotic areas of the human body is the bottom of the spine, so he cut the trousers to hang low on the hips so that this area would be exposed.  His attention to form and detail cannot be overlooked throughout the whole exhibition.

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015
Low slung Bumster trousers

Travelling through, there is much of McQueen’s finest work to be seen, all appropriately set to emphasise the mood and feel behind the clothes.  It’s the closest I’ve ever seen the lines blurred between fashion and art.  If you are unaware of McQueen’s background and his impact on the fashion world, there isn’t a lot of biographical information available however, don’t let that put you off.  His Scottish heritage is prevalent in many of his collections such as ‘Highland Rape’ and ‘The Widows of Culloden’; he wanted to challenge history and the nature of the clothes.  There is a lot to be read and studied about McQueen’s love of Scotland, but for the sake of the exhibition and an appreciation of his work, the reference is there in spades.  It’s in the tartan, the historic cut and his use of rich colours.  But the overriding message isn’t how he challenged history, or how he loved his heritage, or how you are always aware also of his London roots or that he looked into the future with his designs.  No, the strongest message throughout is how he used his work to empower women.  The clothes are fierce and strong and beautifully structured.  I’d be surprised how any woman could not feel empowered in his clothes.  You don’t need a Fashion degree to feel it, it’s everywhere.

Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015

“I want to empower woman, I want people to be afraid of the women I dress”-Alexander McQueen

The use of music, video and installation helps to emphasise the mood of the collection as you travel from room to room and helps you to relive how it was first viewed on the runway.  Without rolling out fashion jargon I can tell you that for me, the whole experience was incredibly moving.  Walking from room to room, for all I was totally in awe of the genius of McQueen, I felt overwhelmingly saddened; in fact there were moments where I almost cried.  Because all I could think about was that McQueen is no longer with us, and whilst the collection celebrates his massive achievements in fashion, you cannot escape the fact that he isn’t here to see it.  I think what ‘Savage Beauty’ does best is that it lets you into the mind of Alexander McQueen and for all his amazing talent, at times this is a very dark and lonely place to be.  Fashion is something that I really got into and started to understand around the time of McQueen’s death in 2010.  I only wish that I’d been more aware of his work when he was alive, but I’m honoured to have had chance to see and feel it before my very eyes at the V&A.

Plato’s Atlantis

Highlights for me?  I don’t want to give too much away because I urge you to go and see it for yourselves, but I personally had three highlights.  The first was Plato’s Atlantis.  Seeing McQueen’s final and most futuristic and groundbreaking collection was unbelievable.  This was his view of how our race would look in the future, if the world was submerged in water.  The use of colour, the famous Armadillo shoes, the structure of the clothes and the bright, serpent-like print captured his message beautifully.  My second highlight was the installation of Kate Moss dancing which again I don’t want to spoil, but it was moment in the exhibition when I was most aware of McQueen’s death.  It is eerie, but both captivating and breathtaking at the same time.  Finally, I loved the Cabinet of Curiosities, which features many of McQueen’s accessories such as Philip Treacy’s Butterfly headdress and the more unusual elements of his work displayed on many different levels.  If you’re visiting, make sure you spend a lot of time in this room as wherever you stand you will see something different; there is so much to take in and be in awe of.  I could’ve stayed there all day!

I’d love to visit ‘Savage Beauty’ again, but sadly I probably won’t get the chance.  It’s a memory I’ll keep forever and one which will take some replacing.  Thank you Alexander McQueen.

So there you have it, Alexander McQueen Savage Beauty 2015. A few years on, I can tell you that I sadly didn’t get to visit the exhibition again, but the memory of it has stayed with me ever since! If you want to learn more about McQueen, I’d really recommend watching the McQueen documentary (currently on Netflix at time of posting) or reading the Savage Beauty exhibition companion. Thanks for reading!

Until Next Time!

Kay x

(4) Comments

  1. I really regret not going to this exhibit! I’ll probably just get the exhibition companion book (the closest thing I can get to experience the exhibit). Thank you for sharing, Kay! 😉

    1. Girl In The Burberry Scarf says:

      You’re so welcome! Glad you enjoyed it!

      Kay x

  2. A part of me understood the rapture. Savage Beauty isn’t like any other fashion exhibition I’ve ever seen. Stick me in front of a show by, say, Balenciaga, and I tend to experience nothing more complicated than hot lust. I feel restlessly acquisitive, just as I do in Liberty or at the vintage fashion fairs I haunt. But McQueen’s work is of a different order altogether. Even as you wonder at its technical accomplishments – a dress of razor clams! A skirt made from plywood! – your awe is already shading into unease. Many of these clothes are exceptionally beautiful; they’re as close to being works of art as fashion ever comes. But many are exceptionally disturbing too: suggestive and cruel. A few are actively repulsive. For every heaven-sent gown (if I must, my stand-out is a silk jacquard dress from 2010 that had been miraculously printed with the angel of the annunciation from the h-century Portinari Altarpiec e by Hugo van der Goes) come half a dozen that seem to have risen straight up from the underworld, the better to strangle you. “I want people to be afraid of the women I dress,” said McQueen famously. I’ve always wondered about this. It seems to me that the element of fear in his work is, and always has been, all about him, for what kind of man would take so much trouble to cut a dress so exquisitely, only to cover the face of the woman who wears it?

    1. Girl In The Burberry Scarf says:

      Some great points here, thanks so much for stopping by! For me, it was the artistry and unpredictability of McQueen that made him an icon and as with all creatures of talent, there’s always an element of ego involved I think. And yes, I know exactly the dress that you’re talking about…Wow!

      Thanks for commenting,

      K

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